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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 848790, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/848790
Review Article

The Emerging Functions of Long Noncoding RNA in Immune Cells: Autoimmune Diseases

1Department of Nephrology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361003, China
2Department of Nephrology, The First Hospital of Xiamen, Fujian Medical University, Xiamen 361003, China
3Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen 361003, China

Received 10 September 2014; Accepted 19 February 2015

Academic Editor: Jianying Zhang

Copyright © 2015 Keshav Raj Sigdel et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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