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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2015, Article ID 856707, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/856707
Review Article

Tolerogenic Dendritic Cells on Transplantation: Immunotherapy Based on Second Signal Blockage

1Department of Biomedical Science, Faculty of Americana (FAM), 13477-360 Americana, SP, Brazil
2Medical School, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), 13083-887 Campinas, SP, Brazil
3Department of Genetics, Evolution and Bioagents, Institute of Biology, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), 13083-970 Campinas, SP, Brazil
4Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Institute of Biosciences, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), 13506-900 Rio Claro, SP, Brazil

Received 24 April 2015; Revised 23 June 2015; Accepted 29 June 2015

Academic Editor: Anil Shanker

Copyright © 2015 Priscila de Matos Silva et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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