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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2015, Article ID 916780, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/916780
Review Article

Vaccines for TB: Lessons from the Past Translating into Future Potentials

1Institute for Research in Molecular Medicine, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Minden, Penang, Malaysia
2ADAPT Research Cluster, Centre for Research Initiatives, Clinical & Health Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia
3School of Health Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Health Campus, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia

Received 13 January 2015; Revised 11 May 2015; Accepted 18 May 2015

Academic Editor: Jacek Tabarkiewicz

Copyright © 2015 Gee Jun Tye et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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