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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2016, Article ID 2876275, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2876275
Review Article

CD1-Restricted T Cells at the Crossroad of Innate and Adaptive Immunity

1Instituto de Investigação e Inovação em Saúde, Universidade do Porto, Porto, Portugal
2Instituto de Biologia Molecular e Celular (IBMC), Universidade do Porto, Porto, Portugal
3Departamento de Ciências Médicas, Universidade de Aveiro, Aveiro, Portugal

Received 8 August 2016; Accepted 13 November 2016

Academic Editor: Mikhail M. Dikov

Copyright © 2016 Catia S. Pereira and M. Fatima Macedo. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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