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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2016, Article ID 2926436, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2926436
Review Article

Dendritic Cells and Their Multiple Roles during Malaria Infection

1Laboratory of Antigen Targeting to Dendritic Cells, Department of Parasitology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of São Paulo, 05508-000 São Paulo, SP, Brazil
2National Institute for Science and Technology in Vaccines, 31270-910 Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil

Received 26 November 2015; Accepted 6 March 2016

Academic Editor: Jacek Tabarkiewicz

Copyright © 2016 Kelly N. S. Amorim et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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