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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 4591468, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4591468
Research Article

Altered Expressions of miR-1238-3p, miR-494, miR-6069, and miR-139-3p in the Formation of Chronic Brucellosis

1Department of Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, Uludag University, Bursa, Turkey
2Department of Medical Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Uludag University, Bursa, Turkey
3Department of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Uludag University, Bursa, Turkey
4Department of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Uludag University, Bursa, Turkey

Received 21 May 2016; Revised 29 July 2016; Accepted 31 July 2016

Academic Editor: Kurt Blaser

Copyright © 2016 Ferah Budak et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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