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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2016, Article ID 6031486, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6031486
Research Article

Monocyte Differentiation towards Protumor Activity Does Not Correlate with M1 or M2 Phenotypes

1Unidad de Investigación en Virología y Cáncer, Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez, Dr. Márquez 162, Colonia Doctores, 06720 Ciudad de México, DF, Mexico
2Programa de Doctorado en Ciencias Biomédicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), 04510 Ciudad de México, DF, Mexico
3UIM en Inmunología, Hospital de Pediatría, CMN Siglo XXI, IMSS, 06720 Ciudad de México, DF, Mexico
4UIM en Inmunoquímica, Hospital de Especialidades, CMN Siglo XXI, IMSS, 06720 Ciudad de México, DF, Mexico

Received 11 March 2016; Accepted 4 May 2016

Academic Editor: Oscar Bottasso

Copyright © 2016 G. Karina Chimal-Ramírez et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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