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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 8606057, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8606057
Review Article

Microglial Dysregulation in OCD, Tourette Syndrome, and PANDAS

1Department of Psychiatry, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA
234 Park Street, 3rd floor, W306, New Haven, CT 06519, USA
3Department of Psychology, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA
4Department of Interdepartmental Neuroscience Program, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA
5Department of Child Study Center, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA

Received 23 September 2016; Accepted 15 November 2016

Academic Editor: Fabiano Carvalho

Copyright © 2016 Luciana Frick and Christopher Pittenger. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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