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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2017, Article ID 1423683, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1423683
Research Article

Plasma Levels of High-Mobility Group Box 1 during Peptide Vaccination in Patients with Recurrent Ovarian Cancer

1Cancer Vaccine Development Division, Research Center for Innovative Cancer Therapy, Kurume University, Kurume, Japan
2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume, Japan
3Cancer Vaccine Center, Kurume University, Kurume, Japan

Correspondence should be addressed to Akira Yamada; pj.ca.u-emuruk.dem@dmyika

Received 6 February 2017; Accepted 5 March 2017; Published 27 April 2017

Academic Editor: Shahab Uddin

Copyright © 2017 Kayoko Waki et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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