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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 3078194, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3078194
Research Article

Saliva-Derived Host Defense Peptides Histatin1 and LL-37 Increase Secretion of Antimicrobial Skin and Oral Mucosa Chemokine CCL20 in an IL-1α-Independent Manner

1Department of Oral Biochemistry, Academic Center for Dentistry Amsterdam, University of Amsterdam and VU University, Amsterdam, Netherlands
2Department of Dermatology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands
3Department of Oral Cell Biology, Academic Center for Dentistry Amsterdam, University of Amsterdam and VU University, Amsterdam, Netherlands

Correspondence should be addressed to Susan Gibbs; ln.cmuv@sbbig.s

Received 15 February 2017; Accepted 19 June 2017; Published 26 July 2017

Academic Editor: Kurt Blaser

Copyright © 2017 Mireille A. Boink et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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