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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 3145742, 7 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3145742
Review Article

Manipulation of Innate and Adaptive Immunity through Cancer Vaccines

UF Brain Tumor Immunotherapy Program, Preston A. Wells Jr. Center for Brain Tumor Therapy, Department of Neurosurgery, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Elias J. Sayour

Received 2 December 2016; Accepted 4 January 2017; Published 6 February 2017

Academic Editor: Said Dermime

Copyright © 2017 Elias J. Sayour and Duane A. Mitchell. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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