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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2017, Article ID 3597613, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3597613
Review Article

Advances in Immunotherapy for Glioblastoma Multiforme

1Department of Neurosurgery, Beijing Electric Hospital, State Grid, Beijing 100073, China
2Department of Neurosurgery, Hubei Provincial Hospital of Integrated Chinese and Western Medicine, Wuhan, Hubei 430015, China
3Central Laboratory, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei 430060, China
4Department of Hematology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei 430060, China
5Department of Neurosurgery, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei 430060, China
6Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Creed Stary; ude.drofnats@yratsc and Xiaoxing Xiong; nc.ude.uhw@gnoixgnixoaix

Received 15 June 2016; Revised 15 January 2017; Accepted 26 January 2017; Published 19 February 2017

Academic Editor: Menaka C. Thounaojam

Copyright © 2017 Boyuan Huang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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