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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 4072364, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4072364
Review Article

The Potential of MicroRNAs as Novel Biomarkers for Transplant Rejection

Terasaki Foundation Laboratory, 11570 W. Olympic Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90064, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Matthias Hamdorf

Received 23 October 2016; Accepted 30 November 2016; Published 16 January 2017

Academic Editor: Senthamil Selvan

Copyright © 2017 Matthias Hamdorf et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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