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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2017, Article ID 4809294, 4 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4809294
Research Article

An Exploration of the Impact of Anticentromere Antibody on Early-Stage Embryo

1Reproductive Medicine Center, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, China
2Reproductive Medicine Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Yiping Zhong; moc.621@rotcodpyz and Canquan Zhou; moc.liamtoh@nauqnacuohz

Received 11 June 2017; Accepted 16 July 2017; Published 4 October 2017

Academic Editor: Jacek Tabarkiewicz

Copyright © 2017 Ying Ying et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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