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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2017, Article ID 4835189, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4835189
Review Article

Intestinal Dysbiosis and Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Link between Gut Microbiota and the Pathogenesis of Rheumatoid Arthritis

1Servicio de Reumatología, Hospital General Regional 220, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Toluca, MEX, Mexico
2Coordinación de Investigación en Salud, Delegación Estado de México Poniente, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Toluca, MEX, Mexico
3Jefatura de División de Investigación en Salud, Unidad Médica de Alta Especialidad Hospital de Traumatología y Ortopedia, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Puebla, PUE, Mexico
4Departamento de Nutrición y Bioprogramación, Instituto Nacional de Perinatología, Secretaría de Salud, Ciudad de México, Mexico
5Departamento de Genética y Biología Molecular, Cinvestav, Av IPN 2508 Col Zacatenco, Ciudad de México, Mexico
6Laboratory of Medical and Environmental Microbiology, Department of Medicine, Autonomous University of the State of Mexico, Toluca, MEX, Mexico

Correspondence should be addressed to Gabriel Horta-Baas; moc.liamtoh@ohbag

Received 23 April 2017; Revised 17 June 2017; Accepted 12 July 2017; Published 30 August 2017

Academic Editor: Mitesh Dwivedi

Copyright © 2017 Gabriel Horta-Baas et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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