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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2017, Article ID 7904821, 14 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7904821
Research Article

Does the Gut Microbiota Influence Immunity and Inflammation in Multiple Sclerosis Pathophysiology?

Department of Neurology in Zabrze, Medical University of Silesia, ul. 3-go Maja 13-15, 41-800 Zabrze, Poland

Correspondence should be addressed to Aldona Medrek; moc.liamg@767anodla

Received 20 September 2016; Revised 31 December 2016; Accepted 2 February 2017; Published 20 February 2017

Academic Editor: Ilian Radichev

Copyright © 2017 Monika Adamczyk-Sowa et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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