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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2018, Article ID 1436236, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/1436236
Research Article

Distinct Profiles of CD163-Positive Macrophages in Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonias

1Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Allergy and Rheumatology, Iwate Medical University School of Medicine, Morioka, Japan
2Department of Pathology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan
3Department of Cancer Biology, Iwate Medical University, Shiwa, Japan
4Division of Diagnostic Pathology, Itabashi Chuo Medical Center, Tokyo, Japan
5Department of Analytic Human Pathology, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, Japan
6Department of Pathology, Iwate Medical University School of Medicine, Morioka, Japan

Correspondence should be addressed to Masahiro Yamashita; pj.ca.dem-etawi@mamay

Received 26 October 2017; Accepted 14 December 2017; Published 4 February 2018

Academic Editor: Zissis Chroneos

Copyright © 2018 Masahiro Yamashita et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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