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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2018 (2018), Article ID 5163129, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/5163129
Review Article

Recent Advances in Drug-Induced Hypersensitivity Syndrome/Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms

Department of Dermatology, Showa University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan

Correspondence should be addressed to Hideaki Watanabe; pj.ca.u-awohs.dem@ebanatawh

Received 2 September 2017; Revised 2 December 2017; Accepted 8 February 2018; Published 18 March 2018

Academic Editor: Wichittra Tassaneeyakul

Copyright © 2018 Hideaki Watanabe. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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