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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2018, Article ID 7519856, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/7519856
Research Article

TLR3 Modulates the Response of NK Cells against Schistosoma japonicum

1Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Allergy & Clinical Immunology, Sino-French Hoffmann Institute, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 511436, China
2Department of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Guangzhou Institute of Respiratory Diseases, State Key Laboratory of Respiratory Disease, The First Affiliated Hospital, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 511436, China
3The Sixth Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510655, China
4Affiliated Xiamen Eye Center & Eye Institute, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361001, China
5Key Laboratory of Protein Modification and Degradation, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 511436, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Nuo Dong; moc.361@eyeforp and Jun Huang; moc.anis@561jh

Received 6 April 2018; Revised 18 June 2018; Accepted 9 July 2018; Published 30 August 2018

Academic Editor: Xiaojun Chen

Copyright © 2018 Jiale Qu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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