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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2018, Article ID 8964085, 14 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/8964085
Research Article

Recombinant Enolase of Trypanosoma cruzi as a Novel Vaccine Candidate against Chagas Disease in a Mouse Model of Acute Infection

1Departamento de Biología Molecular, Juan Badiano No. 1, Col. Sección XVI, Delegación Tlalpan, Instituto Nacional de Cardiología “Ignacio Chávez”, 14080 Mexico City, Mexico
2Departamento de Biología Celular, Avenida Instituto Politecnico Nacional No. 2508, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional, 07360 Mexico City, Mexico
3Departamento de Anatomía Patológica, Juan Badiano No. 1, Col. Sección XVI, Delegación Tlalpan, Instituto Nacional de Cardiología “Ignacio Chávez”, 14080 Mexico City, Mexico
4Departamento de Infectómica y Patogénesis Molecular, Avenida Instituto Politecnico Nacional No. 2508, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional, 07360 Mexico City, Mexico

Correspondence should be addressed to Alejandro Carabarin-Lima; moc.liamtoh@57_iloce

Received 7 February 2018; Accepted 3 April 2018; Published 7 May 2018

Academic Editor: Giuseppe A. Sautto

Copyright © 2018 Minerva Arce-Fonseca et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Trypanosoma cruzi is the protozoan parasite that causes Chagas disease, which is considered by the World Health Organization to be a neglected tropical disease. Two drugs exist for the treatment of Chagas disease, nifurtimox and benznidazole; they are only effective in the acute phase, and a vaccine is currently not available. In this study, we used the recombinant enolase from T. cruzi H8 strain (MHOM/MX/1992/H8 Yucatán) (rTcENO) and its encoding DNA (pBKTcENO) to immunize mice and evaluate their protective effects in an experimental murine model of acute phase infection. Our results showed that mice vaccinated with rTcENO or its encoding DNA were able to generate typical specific antibodies (IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b), suggesting that a mixed Th1/Th2 immune response was induced. The parasite burden in the blood was reduced to 69.8% and 71% in mice vaccinated with rTcENO and pBKTcENO, respectively. The group vaccinated with rTcENO achieved 75% survival, in contrast to the group vaccinated with pBKTcENO that showed no survival in comparison to the control groups. Moreover, rTcENO immunization elevated the production of IFN-γ and IL-2 after the parasite challenge, suggesting that the Th1-type immune response was polarized. These results indicated that rTcENO could be used as a vaccine against Chagas disease.