Journal of Interventional Cardiology
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Acceptance rate24%
Submission to final decision76 days
Acceptance to publication42 days
CiteScore1.870
Journal Citation Indicator0.480
Impact Factor2.279

Obesity Paradox of All-Cause Mortality in 4,133 Patients Treated with Coronary Revascularization

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 Journal profile

Journal of Interventional Cardiology publishes articles focusing on interventional procedures and techniques in the diagnosis, investigation, and management of patients with cardiovascular disease and its associated complications.

 Editor spotlight

Chief Editor, Dr Patrizia Presbitero, is based at IRCCS Humanitas, Italy. Her main research interests include congenital heart disease and cardiocascular diseases in women.

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We currently have a number of Special Issues open for submission. Special Issues highlight emerging areas of research within a field, or provide a venue for a deeper investigation into an existing research area.

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Research Article

Diagnostic Performance of Frequency-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography to Predict Functionally Significant Left Main Coronary Artery Stenosis

Aims. The aim of this study was to assess the safety and diagnostic efficacy of frequency-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) in identifying functional severity of the left main coronary artery (LM) stenosis determined by fractional flow reserve (FFR). Methods and Results. 101 patients with LM lesion (20–70% diameter stenosis angiographically) underwent FFR measurement and FD-OCT imaging of the LM. The following parameters were measured by FD-OCT in the LM: reference lumen area (RLA), reference lumen diameter (RLD), minimum lumen area (MLA), minimum lumen diameter (MLD), % lumen area stenosis, and % diameter stenosis. The LM lesions were analyzable by FD-OCT in 88/101 (87.1%) patients. FFR at maximum hyperemia was ≤0.80 in 39/88 (44.3%) patients. FFR values were correlated significantly with FD-OCT-derived LM lumen parameters. An MLA cutoff value of 5.38 mm2 had the highest sensitivity and specificity of 82% and 81%, respectively, followed by an MLD of 2.43 mm (sensitivity 77%, specificity 72%) and AS of 60% (sensitivity 72%, specificity 72%) for predicting FFR <0.80. Conclusions. FD-OCT is a safe and feasible imaging technique for the assessment of LM stenosis. An FD-OCT-derived MLA of ≤5.38 mm2 strongly predicts the functional severity of an LM lesion.

Research Article

Safety and Effectiveness of Coronary Angiography or Intervention through the Distal Radial Access: A Meta-Analysis

Objectives. Searching the literature for coronary angiography (CAG) or intervention through distal radial access (DRA) and performing a meta-analysis. Background. Coronary angiography (CAG) or intervention through distal radial access (DRA) may have a similar success rate, low radial artery occlusion rate, low radial artery spasm rate, and low rate of puncture site hematoma for patients with coronary heart disease. Therefore, the randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were searched, and the data were pooled for meta-analysis to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of DRA. Methods. RCTs comparing the CAG or intervention through DRA vs. transradial access (TRA) published between January 1, 2017, and May 4, 2021, were searched in the PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane databases. The endpoints included the rate of access success and the number of radial artery occlusions, radial artery spasms, and puncture site hematomas. The data were extracted, and a random-effects model was used for analysis. Results. Among 204 studies, 6 RCTs (with 2825 participants) met the inclusion criteria. Compared to TRA, the access success rate in DRA () and the lower rate of puncture site hematoma were not significantly different (), while the radial artery occlusion rate () and radial artery spasm rate () were significantly lower. Conclusion. In summary, DRA has a similar access success rate and incidence of hematoma at the puncture site, but a lower incidence of RAO and spasm compared to TRA. These findings demonstrated that DRA is a safe and effective access for CAG or intervention.

Research Article

Coil Embolization for Coronary Artery Perforation: A Retrospective Analysis of 110 Patients

Objective. Coil embolization (CE) for coronary artery perforation (CAP) has not been thoroughly evaluated. This study aimed to evaluate the extent of myocardial damage and impact on cardiac function after CE for CAP. Methods. A total of 110 consecutive patients treated with CE for CAP were retrospectively identified. The degree of myocardial damage and impact on cardiac function were evaluated. Results. Forty-nine (44.5%) cases involved chronic total occlusions. A guidewire was the cause of perforation in 97 (88.2%) patients. The success rate of CE was 98.2%. Almost all patients were prescribed either antiplatelet drugs or anticoagulant medication or both. Patients with perforation types III and IV were found to be prone to creatinine kinase (CK) elevation and epicardial main vessel perforation, thereby causing myocardial damage. No changes were noted in the ejection fraction (EF) in patients with type V distal perforation and collateral channel perforation, while patients with perforation of the epicardial main vessel may show impaired cardiac function afterward. Conclusions. CE is safe and effective for treating CAP, especially when collateral channels and distal vessels are involved. Meanwhile, efforts should be taken to prevent CAP in epicardial main vessels since it may be difficult to treat with CS and cause myocardial damage when bailed out with CE leading to vessel sacrifice. We found that it was not necessary to change the anticoagulant regimen after CE owing to its ability to achieve robust hemostasis.

Research Article

Left Ventricular End-Diastolic Pressure and B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Levels Guidance of Low-Dose Furosemide Treatment to Prevent Contrast-Induced Nephropathy in Patients with Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Objective. We aimed to explore the preventive effect of low-dose furosemide administration guided by left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) based on adequate hydration on contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) in patients with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Methods. This parallel randomized clinical trial was conducted at a tertiary hospital in China. A total of 1053 consecutive patients (71.98% men) who underwent PCI at our hospital were enrolled. Pre-PCI plasma BNP levels were recorded. Patients enrolled received a continuous intravenous infusion of normal saline starting 4 h before PCI until 24 h after surgery. LVEDP was measured immediately after surgery. Patients in the control group received intravenous furosemide injection (20 mg). Patients in the experimental group received furosemide if they showed LVEDP ≥15 mmHg, a post-PCI BNP level ≥100 pg/mL, and/or a post-PCI BNP value > 150% of the pre-PCI value. The primary and secondary outcome measures were serum creatinine levels, glomerular filtration rate, and creatinine clearance rate measured before and after PCI. CIN incidence was compared between the two groups. Logistic regression analysis was used to study the risk factors for CIN. Results. CIN incidence was significantly higher in the control group than in the experimental group (). Logistic regression analysis showed that elevated LVEDP and BNP levels were risk factors. As LVEDP increased, the CIN incidence also increased (odds ratio (OR) 1.038, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.006–1.070). The OR of BNP was 1.001 (95% CI 1.000–1.002). Conclusions. Low-dose furosemide administration guided by LVEDP or BNP is superior to direct low-dose administration on the basis of adequate hydration during PCI. This trial is registered with ChiCTR-IOR-14005250

Research Article

Endovascular Treatment of Right Heart Masses Utilizing the AngioVac System: A 6-Year Single-Center Observational Study

Objective. To describe our institution’s experience with the AngioVac system. Background. Intracardiac and intravascular masses previously required surgical excision, but now, there are a number of minimally invasive options. With the advent of vacuum aspiration, more specifically the AngioVac System (AngioDynamics, NY, USA), there exists a system with both low mortality and minor complications. However, the number of retrospective studies remains limited. Outcome data for high-risk patients are also limited. Methods. Data were collected and analyzed in patients who underwent AngioVac therapy at our tertiary care center from January 2014 to December 2020. Results. Our results demonstrated a 93.3% intraoperative success rate and a 100% intraoperative survival rate. However, a number of complications, including but not limited to hematomas, anemia, and hypotension, occurred, as described below. Conclusions. Our experiences demonstrated good outcomes and continue to support the usefulness of the AngioVac System. The data also support the use of AngioVac as a treatment option for the debulking or removal of right heart masses in critically ill patients.

Research Article

Short- and Long-Term Prognosis of Intravascular Ultrasound-Versus Angiography-Guided Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: A Meta-Analysis Involving 24,783 Patients

Background. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) guided percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has potential benefits. This meta-analysis aimed to explore whether IVUS-guided PCI had better short- and long-term prognoses than angiography-guided PCI. Methods. We retrieved studies from PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library. Clinical trials including retrospective and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared IVUS-guided PCI with angiography-guided PCI were included. The patients were followed up after operation at 30 days, 1 year, 2 years, and 3 years. The clinical outcomes were target lesion revascularization (TLR), target vessel revascularization (TVR), and MACEs, including stent thrombosis (ST), myocardial infarction (MI), cardiac death, and all-cause death. The study population included patients with MI, coronary bifurcation lesions, short or long lesions, and unprotected left main coronary artery stenosis (ULMCA). The quality of retrospective trials was evaluated using the Newcastle–Ottawa Scale, and the quality of randomized controlled trials was evaluated using the Jadad score. A total of 20 clinical trials met the criteria. Three trials were randomized controlled trials, while 17 were retrospective trials. Results. A total of 24,783 patients were included. In observational trials, the OR of MACEs was 0.49 (95% CI: 0.38–0.62) in 30 days, 0.65 (95% CI: 0.58–0.73) in one year, 0.51 (95% CI: 0.36–0.71) in two years, and 0.45 (95% CI: 0.31–0.65) in three years. In patients with long coronary lesions, the OR of MACEs in 1 year was 0.64 (95% CI: 0.28–1.50). In patients with left main artery disease, the OR of MACEs in 3 years was 0.42 (95% CI: 0.26–0.67). Compared with angiography-guided PCI, IVUS-guided PCI was associated with a lower incidence of MACEs during the same following period. Conclusion. Compared with angiography-guided PCI, IVUS-guided PCI has better performance in reducing the occurrence of MACEs.

Journal of Interventional Cardiology
Publishing Collaboration
More info
Wiley Hindawi logo
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate24%
Submission to final decision76 days
Acceptance to publication42 days
CiteScore1.870
Journal Citation Indicator0.480
Impact Factor2.279
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Article of the Year Award: Outstanding research contributions of 2020, as selected by our Chief Editors. Read the winning articles.