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Journal of Lipids
Volume 2011, Article ID 418313, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/418313
Review Article

The Dynamics of Oxidized LDL during Atherogenesis

Department of Biological Chemistry, Showa University School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 1-5-8 Hatanodai, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 142-8555, Japan

Received 17 January 2011; Accepted 9 March 2011

Academic Editor: Angeliki Chroni

Copyright © 2011 Hiroyuki Itabe et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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