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Journal of Lipids
Volume 2011, Article ID 676535, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/676535
Research Article

Novel Polyoxyethylene-Containing Glycolipids Are Synthesized in Corynebacterium matruchotii and Mycobacterium smegmatis Cultured in the Presence of Tween 80

1Mycobacteriology Research Laboratory, William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital, Madison, WI 53705, USA
2Chemical Biology & Therapeutics, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN 38105, USA
3Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA
4Department of Bacteriology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA

Received 16 March 2010; Accepted 21 April 2010

Academic Editor: Sampath Parthasarathy

Copyright © 2011 Cindy Wang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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