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Journal of Lipids
Volume 2012, Article ID 189681, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/189681
Research Article

Novel Associations of Nonstructural Loci with Paraoxonase Activity

Department of Genetics, Texas Biomedical Research Institute, P.O. Box 760549, San Antonio, TX 78245-0549, USA

Received 22 January 2012; Accepted 19 February 2012

Academic Editor: Mira Rosenblat

Copyright © 2012 Ellen E. Quillen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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