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Journal of Lipids
Volume 2013, Article ID 517943, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/517943
Research Article

Association of RXR-Gamma Gene Variants with Familial Combined Hyperlipidemia: Genotype and Haplotype Analysis

1Endocrinology and Diabetes, Department of Experimental Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, 00161 Rome, Italy
2Endocrinology and Diabetes, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Cagliari, 09042 Cagliari, Italy
3Department of Clinical and Medical Therapy, Unit of Atherosclerosis, Sapienza University of Rome, 00161 Rome, Italy
4Sahlgrenska Center for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, University of Gothenburg, SE-413 45 Gothenburg, Sweden

Received 28 June 2013; Accepted 5 September 2013

Academic Editor: Akihiro Inazu

Copyright © 2013 Federica Sentinelli et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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