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Journal of Marine Biology
Volume 2011, Article ID 406812, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/406812
Research Article

Coral Bleaching Susceptibility Is Decreased following Short-Term (1–3 Year) Prior Temperature Exposure and Evolutionary History

1Department of Life Sciences, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, 6300 Ocean Drive-Unit 5869, Corpus Christi, TX 78412, USA
2Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium (LUMCON), 8124 Highway 56, Chauvin, LA 70344, USA

Received 16 March 2011; Accepted 4 June 2011

Academic Editor: Baruch Rinkevich

Copyright © 2011 Joshua A. Haslun et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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