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Journal of Marine Biology
Volume 2011, Article ID 473615, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/473615
Review Article

Reviewing the Effects of Ocean Acidification on Sexual Reproduction and Early Life History Stages of Reef-Building Corals

Division of Climate Change and Ocean Acidification, Australian Institute of Marine Science, PMB 3, Townsville MC, Townsville, QLD 4810, Australia

Received 15 May 2011; Revised 20 August 2011; Accepted 24 August 2011

Academic Editor: Horst Felbeck

Copyright © 2011 Rebecca Albright. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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