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Journal of Marine Biology
Volume 2014, Article ID 351921, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/351921
Research Article

Olive Ridley Sea Turtle Hatching Success as a Function of Microbial Abundance and the Microenvironment of In Situ Nest Sand at Ostional, Costa Rica

1Department of Biology, College of Charleston, 66 George Street, Charleston, SC 29424, USA
2Department of Biological Sciences, Southeastern Louisiana University, SLU Box 10736, Hammond, LA 70402, USA

Received 11 August 2014; Revised 18 November 2014; Accepted 21 November 2014; Published 22 December 2014

Academic Editor: Horst Felbeck

Copyright © 2014 Vanessa S. Bézy et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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