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Journal of Marine Biology
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 769356, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/769356
Research Article

The Immune Response of Acanthaster planci to Oxbile Injections and Antibiotic Treatment

1School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD 4811, Australia
2ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD 4811, Australia
3Australian Institute of Marine Science, PMB No. 3, Townsville, QLD 4810, Australia

Received 16 December 2013; Accepted 10 March 2014; Published 9 April 2014

Academic Editor: Norman Ying Shiu Woo

Copyright © 2014 Alexandra Grand et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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