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Journal of Marine Biology
Volume 2015, Article ID 848923, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/848923
Research Article

Trends in Marine Turtle Strandings along the East Queensland, Australia Coast, between 1996 and 2013

1Veterinary Marine Animals Research, Teaching and Investigation (Vet-MARTI) Unit, School of Veterinary Science, The University of Queensland, Gatton, QLD 4343, Australia
2The Florida Aquarium’s Center for Conservation, Apollo Beach, FL 33572, USA
3School of Forest Resources and Conservation, The Florida Aquarium’s Center for Conservation, University of Florida, Apollo Beach, FL 33572, USA
4Queensland Department of Environment and Heritage Protection, Queensland Government, Brisbane, QLD 4102, Australia

Received 29 July 2015; Revised 12 October 2015; Accepted 22 October 2015

Academic Editor: Nobuyuki Miyazaki

Copyright © 2015 Jaylene Flint et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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