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Journal of Marine Biology
Volume 2016, Article ID 6825949, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6825949
Research Article

Colorimetric Detection of Caspase 3 Activity and Reactive Oxygen Derivatives: Potential Early Indicators of Thermal Stress in Corals

1Université de Perpignan Via Domitia, 52 avenue Paul Alduy, 66860 Perpignan, France
2Plant Functional Biology and Climate Change Cluster (C3), University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2007, Australia
3Université de Brest, 3 rue des Archives, CS 93837, 29238 Brest Cedex 3, France

Received 30 October 2015; Revised 4 February 2016; Accepted 11 February 2016

Academic Editor: Robert A. Patzner

Copyright © 2016 Mickael Ros et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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