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Journal of Marine Biology
Volume 2016, Article ID 9261309, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9261309
Research Article

Synergistic Effects of Salinity and Temperature on the Survival of Two Nonnative Bivalve Molluscs, Perna viridis (Linnaeus 1758) and Mytella charruana (d’Orbigny 1846)

Department of Biology, University of Central Florida, 4000 University Boulevard, Orlando, FL 32816-2368, USA

Received 29 April 2016; Accepted 26 June 2016

Academic Editor: Baruch Rinkevich

Copyright © 2016 Wei S. Yuan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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