Table of Contents
Journal of Medical Engineering
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 314138, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/314138
Research Article

A Structured Approach for Investigating the Causes of Medical Device Adverse Events

Department of Medical Physics, Crosshouse Hospital, Kilmarnock KA2 0BE, UK

Received 21 May 2014; Revised 10 October 2014; Accepted 14 October 2014; Published 27 November 2014

Academic Editor: Anthony J. McGoron

Copyright © 2014 John N. Amoore. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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