Table of Contents
Journal of Mycology
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 898202, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/898202
Research Article

The Anticandidal and Toxicity Properties of Lampranthus francisci

Department of Biochemistry, University of Zimbabwe, Mt. Pleasant, Harare, Zimbabwe

Received 17 July 2015; Revised 17 September 2015; Accepted 20 September 2015

Academic Editor: Samuel A. Lee

Copyright © 2015 Batanai Moyo and Stanley Mukanganyama. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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