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Journal of Nucleic Acids
Volume 2010, Article ID 840768, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2010/840768
Review Article

Overview of DNA Repair in Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma brucei, and Leishmania major

Departamento de Bioquímica e Imunologia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Avenida Antônio Carlos, 6627, Pampulha, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil

Received 17 June 2010; Revised 29 July 2010; Accepted 25 August 2010

Academic Editor: Ashis Basu

Copyright © 2010 Danielle Gomes Passos-Silva et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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