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Journal of Nanomaterials
Volume 2014, Article ID 635609, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/635609
Research Article

CLSVOF Method to Study the Formation Process of Taylor Cone in Crater-Like Electrospinning of Nanofibers

1Key Laboratory of Advanced Textile Composites, Ministry of Education of China, Tianjin Polytechnic University, 399 West Binshui Road, Tianjin 300387, China
2School of Textiles, Tianjin Polytechnic University, 399 West Binshui Road, Tianjin 300387, China
3School of Science, Tianjin Polytechnic University, 399 West Binshui Road, Tianjin 300387, China
4Department of Textiles, Zhejiang Fashion Institute of Technology, No. 495 Fenghua Road, Ningbo, Zhejiang 31521, China

Received 24 February 2014; Revised 3 May 2014; Accepted 5 May 2014; Published 11 June 2014

Academic Editor: Aihua He

Copyright © 2014 Yong Liu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The application of two-phase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for simulating crater-like Taylor cone formation dynamics in a viscous liquid is a challenging task. An interface coupled level set/volume-of-fluid (CLSVOF) method and the governing equations based on Navier-Stokes equations were employed to simulate the crater-like Taylor cone formation process. The computational results of the dynamics of crater-like Taylor cone slowly formed on a free liquid surface produced by a submerged nozzle in a viscous liquid were presented in this paper. Some experiments with different air pressures were carried out to evaluate the simulation results. The results from both CFD and experimental observations were compared and analyzed. The numerical results were consistent with the experimental results. Our study showed that the CLSVOF method gave convincing results, and the computational method is robust to extreme variations in interfacial topology.