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Journal of Nanomaterials
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 451405, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/451405
Research Article

Lipoamino Acid Coated Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Concentration and Time Dependently Enhanced Growth of Human Hepatocarcinoma Cell Line (Hep-G2)

1Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Pharmacy, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 71345-1583, Shiraz, Iran
2Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 71345-1583, Shiraz, Iran
3Department of Medicinal Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 71345-1583, Shiraz, Iran
4Department of Medical Biotechnology, Fasa University of Medical Sciences, Fasa 74616-86688, Iran
5Department of Pharmacognosy, School of Pharmacy, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 71345-1583, Shiraz, Iran

Received 17 November 2014; Revised 14 March 2015; Accepted 23 March 2015

Academic Editor: Paulo Cesar Morais

Copyright © 2015 Ahmad Gholami et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) have been widely used in medicine for magnetic resonance imaging, hyperthermia, and drug delivery applications. The effect of SPION on animal cells has been a controversial issue on which there are many contradictions. This study focused on preparation of SPION with novel biocompatible coatings, their characterization, and cytotoxicity evaluation. An amino acid (glycine) and two novel lipo-amino acids (2 amino-hexanoic acid and 2 amino-hexadecanoic acid) coated magnetic nanoparticles were characterized by various physicochemical means such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The cytotoxicity profile of the synthesized nanoparticles on Hep-G2 cells as measured by MTT assay showed the nanoparticles are nontoxic and the cell growth is promoted by SPION. Moreover, lipoamino acid coating SPION appear more beneficial than the other ones. By increasing concentration of SPION, growth enhancing impact will attenuate and toxicity will appear. Although the aggregation of SPION can affect the results, the gradual delivery of ferric/ferrous ions into cells is the main cause of this growth promotion effect. Conclusively, this study shows that lipoamino acid coating SPION can be used for various biomedical purposes.