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Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 960363, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/960363
Review Article

Creatine-Kinase- and Exercise-Related Muscle Damage Implications for Muscle Performance and Recovery

School of Science, University of the West of Scotland, Paisley PA1 2BE, UK

Received 21 June 2011; Revised 6 September 2011; Accepted 28 September 2011

Academic Editor: H. K. Biesalski

Copyright © 2012 Marianne F. Baird et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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