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Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism
Volume 2014, Article ID 980547, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/980547
Research Article

HO-1 Upregulation Attenuates Adipocyte Dysfunction, Obesity, and Isoprostane Levels in Mice Fed High Fructose Diets

1Department of Internal Medicine, Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, Huntington, WV 25701, USA
2Departments of Medicine and Pharmacology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY 10595, USA

Received 19 June 2014; Accepted 14 August 2014; Published 9 September 2014

Academic Editor: Stan Kubow

Copyright © 2014 Zeid Khitan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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