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Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism
Volume 2015, Article ID 760689, 23 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/760689
Review Article

Modulation of Metabolic Detoxification Pathways Using Foods and Food-Derived Components: A Scientific Review with Clinical Application

1University of Bridgeport, 126 Park Avenue, Bridgeport, CT 07748, USA
2Institute for Functional Medicine, 505 S. 336th Street, Suite 500, Federal Way, WA 98003, USA
3University of Western States, 2900 NE 132nd Avenue, Portland, OR 97230, USA

Received 5 January 2015; Accepted 20 March 2015

Academic Editor: H. K. Biesalski

Copyright © 2015 Romilly E. Hodges and Deanna M. Minich. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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