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Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism
Volume 2017, Article ID 2785142, 17 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/2785142
Research Article

Plasma and Aorta Biochemistry and MMPs Activities in Female Rabbit Fed Methionine Enriched Diet and Their Offspring

1Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Biology, Biochemistry of Extracellular Matrix Remodeling, Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Technological Sciences Houari Boumediene, BP 32, El Alia, 16011 Algiers, Algeria
2Laboratory of Physiology of Organisms, Team of Cellular and Molecular Physiopathology, Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Technological Sciences Houari Boumediene, BP 32, EL Alia, 16011 Algiers, Algeria

Correspondence should be addressed to Khira Othmani Mecif; moc.liamy@inamhtok

Received 15 July 2016; Accepted 22 November 2016; Published 4 January 2017

Academic Editor: Michael B. Zemel

Copyright © 2017 Khira Othmani Mecif et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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