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Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism
Volume 2018, Article ID 6785741, 6 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/6785741
Research Article

Snacking Behaviour and Its Determinants among College-Going Students in Coastal South India

1Kasturba Medical College, Manipal Academy of Higher Education, Mangaluru, Karnataka, India
2Georgetown University Hospital, Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC, USA
3All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Basni Industrial Area, Phase-2, Jodhpur 342005, Rajasthan, India
4Prasanna School of Public Health, Manipal Academy of Higher Education, Manipal, Karnataka, India

Correspondence should be addressed to Rekha Thapar; ude.lapinam@rapaht.ahker

Received 14 February 2018; Revised 13 March 2018; Accepted 20 March 2018; Published 18 April 2018

Academic Editor: José María Huerta

Copyright © 2018 Prasanna Mithra et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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