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Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism
Volume 2019, Article ID 7631306, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/7631306
Review Article

Dietary Iron Intake in Women of Reproductive Age in Europe: A Review of 49 Studies from 29 Countries in the Period 1993–2015

Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Næstved Hospital, University College Zealand, DK-4700 Næstved, Denmark

Correspondence should be addressed to Nils Thorm Milman; moc.kooltuo@namlim.slin

Received 7 January 2019; Revised 5 May 2019; Accepted 26 May 2019; Published 13 June 2019

Academic Editor: Luigi Schiavo

Copyright © 2019 Nils Thorm Milman. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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