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Journal of Nanotechnology
Volume 2012, Article ID 247427, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/247427
Review Article

Immunocompatibility of Bacteriophages as Nanomedicines

School of Pharmacy, University of Waterloo, Health Sciences Campus, 10 Victoria Street South, Kitchener, ON, Canada N2L 3C4

Received 23 July 2011; Revised 15 January 2012; Accepted 24 January 2012

Academic Editor: Chunying Chen

Copyright © 2012 Tranum Kaur et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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