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Journal of Nanotechnology
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 369139, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/369139
Research Article

Organic Nanovesicular Cargoes for Sustained Drug Delivery: Synthesis, Vesicle Formation, Controlling “Pearling” States, and Terfenadine Loading/Release Studies

1Functional Molecular Nano/Micro Solids Laboratory, School of Chemistry, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046, India
2Organic & Medicinal Chemistry, Dr. Reddy’s Institute of Life Sciences, University of Hyderabad Campus, Hyderabad 500046, India
3Biology Department, Dr. Reddy’s Institute of Life Sciences, University of Hyderabad Campus, Hyderabad 500046, India
4Zephase Therapeutics, Dr. Reddy’s Institute of Life Sciences, University of Hyderabad Campus, Hyderabad 500046, India

Received 25 February 2014; Accepted 7 June 2014; Published 12 August 2014

Academic Editor: Paresh Chandra Ray

Copyright © 2014 Ajay Kumar Botcha et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

“Sustained drug delivery systems” which are designed to accomplish long-lasting therapeutic effect are one of the challenging topics in the area of nanomedicine. We developed an innovative strategy to prepare nontoxic and polymer stabilized organic nanovesicles (diameter: 200 nm) from a novel bolaamphiphile, where two hydrogen bonding acetyl cytosine molecules connected to 4,4′′-positions of the 2,6-bispyrazolylpyridine through two flexible octyne chains. The nanovesicles behave like biological membrane by spontaneously self-assembling into “pearl-like” chains and subsequently forming long nanotubes (diameter: 150 nm), which further develop into various types of network-junctions through self-organization. For drug loading and delivery applications, the nanovesicles were externally protected with biocompatible poly(ethyleneglycol)-2000 to prevent them from fusion and ensuing tube formation. Nontoxic nature of the nanovesicles was demonstrated by zebrafish teratogenicity assay. Biocompatible nanovesicles were loaded with “terfenadine” drug and successfully utilized to transport and release drug in sustained manner (up to 72 h) in zebrafish larvae, which is recognized as an emerging in vivo model system.