Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Journal of Oncology
Volume 2009 (2009), Article ID 581939, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/581939
Review Article

Autoantibodies to Tumor-Associated Antigens in Epithelial Ovarian Carcinoma

1Unit of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Soroka Medical Center and Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva 84101, Israel
2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sapir Medical Center, Sackler School of Medicine, University of Tel-Aviv, Kfar Saba 44281, Israel

Received 22 May 2009; Accepted 10 November 2009

Academic Editor: Charles F. Levenback

Copyright © 2009 Benjamin Piura and Ettie Piura. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. H. Lu, V. Goodell, and M. L. Disis, “Humoral immunity directed against tumor-associated antigens as potential biomarkers for the early diagnosis of cancer,” Journal of Proteome Research, vol. 7, no. 4, pp. 1388–1394, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  2. A. Gagnon, J.-H. Kim, J. O. Schorge et al., “Use of a combination of approaches to identify and validate relevant tumor-associated antigens and their corresponding autoantibodies in ovarian cancer patients,” Clinical Cancer Research, vol. 14, no. 3, pp. 764–771, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  3. J. A. Koziol, J.-Y. Zhang, C. A. Casiano et al., “Recursive partitioning as an approach to selection of immune markers for tumor diagnosis,” Clinical Cancer Research, vol. 9, no. 14, pp. 5120–5126, 2003. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. J.-Y. Zhang, C. A. Casiano, X.-X. Peng, J. A. Koziol, E. K. L. Chan, and E. M. Tan, “Enhancement of antibody detection in cancer using panel of recombinant tumor-associated antigens,” Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention, vol. 12, no. 2, pp. 136–143, 2003. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. M. J. Scanlan, S. Welt, C. M. Gordon et al., “Cancer-related serological recognition of human colon cancer: identification of potential diagnostic and immunotherapeutic targets,” Cancer Research, vol. 62, no. 14, pp. 4041–4047, 2002. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. A. Barua, M. J. Bradaric, T. Kebede et al., “Anti-tumor and anti-ovarian autoantibodies in women with ovarian cancer,” American Journal of Reproductive Immunology, vol. 57, no. 4, pp. 243–249, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  7. U. Sahin, Ö. Türeci, H. Schmitt et al., “Human neoplasms elicit multiple specific immune responses in the autologous host,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 92, no. 25, pp. 11810–11813, 1995. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. J.-L. Chen, P. R. Dunbar, U. Gileadi et al., “Identification of NY-ESO-1 peptide analogues capable of improved stimulation of tumor-reactive CTL,” The Journal of Immunology, vol. 165, no. 2, pp. 948–955, 2000. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. L.-Y. Luo, I. Herrera, A. Soosaipillai, and E. P. Diamandis, “Identification of heat shock protein 90 and other proteins as tumour antigens by serological screening of an ovarian carcinoma expression library,” British Journal of Cancer, vol. 87, no. 3, pp. 339–343, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  10. L. J. Old and Y.-T. Chen, “New paths in human cancer serology,” The Journal of Experimental Medicine, vol. 187, no. 8, pp. 1163–1167, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. K. Odunsi, A. A. Jungbluth, E. Stockert et al., “NY-ESO-1 and LAGE-1 cancer-testis antigens are potential targets for immunotherapy in epithelial ovarian cancer,” Cancer Research, vol. 63, no. 18, pp. 6076–6083, 2003. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. F. Fernández Madrid, “Autoantibodies in breast cancer sera: candidate biomarkers and reporters of tumorigenesis,” Cancer Letters, vol. 230, no. 2, pp. 187–198, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  13. United States Cancer Statistics (USCS) Data, 2004, http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/uscs/.
  14. A. Saleemuddin, A. K. Folkins, L. Garrett et al., “Risk factors for a serous cancer precursor (“p53 signature”) in women with inherited BRCA mutations,” Gynecologic Oncology, vol. 111, no. 2, pp. 226–232, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  15. H. Naora, F. J. Montz, C.-Y. Chai, and R. B. S. Roden, “Aberrant expression of homeobox gene HOXA7 is associated with müllerian-like differentiation of epithelial ovarian tumors and the generation of a specific autologous antibody response,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 98, no. 26, pp. 15209–15214, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  16. I.-M. Shih and R. J. Kurman, “Ovarian serous carcinogenesis—a proposed model,” in Current Clinical Oncology: Molecular Pathology of Gynecologic Cancer, A. Girdano, A. Bovicelli, and R. Kurman, Eds., Humana Press, Totowa, NJ, USA, 2007. View at Google Scholar
  17. K. R. Cho and I.-M. Shih, “Ovarian cancer,” Annual Review of Pathology: Mechanisms of Disease, vol. 4, pp. 287–313, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  18. R. J. Kurman, K. Visvanathan, R. Roden, T. C. Wu, and I.-M. Shih, “Early detection and treatment of ovarian cancer: shifting from early stage to minimal volume of disease based on a new model of carcinogenesis,” American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 198, no. 4, pp. 351–356, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  19. I.-M. Shih and R. J. Kurman, “Ovarian tumorigenesis: a proposed model based on morphological and molecular genetic analysis,” American Journal of Pathology, vol. 164, no. 5, pp. 1511–1518, 2004. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. B. Stone, M. Schummer, P. J. Paley et al., “Serologic analysis of ovarian tumor antigens reveals a bias toward antigens encoded on 17q,” International Journal of Cancer, vol. 104, no. 1, pp. 73–84, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  21. A. Erkanli, D. D. Taylor, D. Dean et al., “Application of Bayesian modeling of autologous antibody responses against ovarian tumor-associated antigens to cancer detection,” Cancer Research, vol. 66, no. 3, pp. 1792–1798, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  22. A. Gadducci, M. Ferdeghini, F. Buttitta et al., “Assessment of the prognostic relevance of serum anti-p53 antibodies in epithelial ovarian cancer,” Gynecologic Oncology, vol. 72, no. 1, pp. 76–81, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed
  23. T. Soussi, “p53 antibodies in the sera of patients with various types of cancer: a review,” Cancer Research, vol. 60, no. 7, pp. 1777–1788, 2000. View at Google Scholar
  24. B. Abendstein, C. Marth, E. Muller-Holzner, M. Widschwendter, G. Daxenbichler, and A. G. Zeimet, “Clinical significance of serum and ascitic p53 autoantibodies in epithelial ovarian carcinoma,” Cancer, vol. 88, no. 6, pp. 1432–1437, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  25. D. P. Lane, “p53, guardian of the genome,” Nature, vol. 358, no. 6381, pp. 15–16, 1992. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed
  26. C. C. Harris and M. Hollstein, “Clinical implications of the p53 tumor-suppressor gene,” The New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 329, no. 18, pp. 1318–1327, 1993. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. F. Chang, S. Syrjanen, and K. Syrjanen, “Implications of the p53 tumor-suppressor gene in clinical oncology,” Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 13, no. 4, pp. 1009–1022, 1995. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. F. D. Vogl, M. Frey, R. Kreienberg, and I. B. Runnebaum, “Autoimmunity against p53 predicts invasive cancer with poor survival in patients with an ovarian mass,” British Journal of Cancer, vol. 83, no. 10, pp. 1338–1343, 2000. View at Google Scholar
  29. P. A. Hall and D. P. Lane, “p53 in tumour pathology: can we trust immunohistochemistry?—Revisited!,” Journal of Pathology, vol. 172, no. 1, pp. 1–4, 1994. View at Google Scholar
  30. K. Angelopoulou, B. Rosen, M. Stratis, H. Yu, M. Solomou, and E. P. Diamandis, “Circulating antibodies against p53 protein in patients with ovarian carcinoma: correlation with clinicopathologic features and survival,” Cancer, vol. 78, no. 10, pp. 2146–2152, 1996. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  31. K. Angelopoulou, E. P. Diamandis, D. J. A. Sutherland, J. A. Kellen, and P. S. Bunting, “Prevalence of serum antibodies against the p53 tumor suppressor gene protein in various cancers,” International Journal of Cancer, vol. 58, no. 4, pp. 480–487, 1994. View at Google Scholar
  32. J. A. Green, L. J. Robertson, I. R. Campbell, and J. Jenkins, “Expression of the p53 gene and presence of serum autoantibodies in ovarian cancer: correlation with differentiation,” Cancer Detection and Prevention, vol. 19, no. 2, pp. 151–155, 1995. View at Google Scholar
  33. M. Tsai-Turton, A. Santillan, D. Lu et al., “p53 autoantibodies, cytokine levels and ovarian carcinogenesis,” Gynecologic Oncology, vol. 114, no. 1, pp. 12–17, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  34. R. Lubin, B. Schlichtholz, D. Bengoufa et al., “Analysis of p53 antibodies in patients with various cancers define B-cell epitopes of human p53: distribution on primary structure and exposure on protein surface,” Cancer Research, vol. 53, no. 24, pp. 5872–5876, 1993. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. S. F. Winter, J. D. Minna, B. E. Johnson, T. Takahashi, A. F. Gazdar, and D. P. Carbone, “Development of antibodies against p53 in lung cancer patients appears to be dependent on the type of p53 mutation,” Cancer Research, vol. 52, no. 15, pp. 4168–4174, 1992. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  36. A. M. Davidoff, J. D. Iglehart, and J. R. Marks, “Immune response to p53 is dependent upon p53/HSP70 complexes in breast cancers,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 89, no. 8, pp. 3439–3442, 1992. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  37. J. G. A. Houbiers, S. H. van der Burg, L. M. G. van de Watering et al., “Antibodies against p53 are associated with poor prognosis of colorectal cancer,” British Journal of Cancer, vol. 72, no. 3, pp. 637–641, 1995. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  38. F. D. Vogl, E. Stickeler, M. Weyermann et al., “p53 autoantibodies in patients with primary ovarian cancer are associated with higher age, advanced stage and a higher proportion of p53-positive tumor cells,” Oncology, vol. 57, no. 4, pp. 324–329, 1999. View at Google Scholar
  39. B. Schlichtholz, J. Tredaniel, R. Lubin, G. Zalcman, A. Hirsch, and T. Soussi, “Analyses of p53 antibodies in sera of patients with lung carcinoma define immunodominant regions in the p53 protein,” British Journal of Cancer, vol. 69, no. 5, pp. 809–816, 1994. View at Google Scholar
  40. B. Schlichtholz, Y. Legros, D. Gillet et al., “The immune response to p53 in breast cancer patients is directed against immunodominant epitopes unrelated to the mutational hot spot,” Cancer Research, vol. 52, no. 22, pp. 6380–6384, 1992. View at Google Scholar
  41. P. A. Vasey, N. A. Jones, S. Jenkins, C. Dive, and R. Brown, “Cisplatin, camptothecin, and taxol sensitivities of cells with p53-associated multidrug resistance,” Molecular Pharmacology, vol. 50, no. 6, pp. 1536–1540, 1996. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  42. F. Buttitta, A. Marchetti, A. Gadducci et al., “P53 alterations are predictive of chemoresistance and aggressiveness in ovarian carcinomas: a molecular and immunohistochemical study,” British Journal of Cancer, vol. 75, no. 2, pp. 230–235, 1997. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  43. A. Gadducci, M. Ferdeghini, F. Buttitta et al., “Preoperative serum antibodies against the p53 protein in patients with ovarian and endometrial cancer,” Anticancer Research, vol. 16, no. 6B, pp. 3519–3524, 1996. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  44. K. Mayerhofer, C. Tempfer, E. Kucera et al., “Humoral p53 antibody response is a prognostic parameter in ovarian cancer,” Anticancer Research, vol. 19, no. 1B, pp. 875–878, 1999. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  45. E. V. S. Hogdall, C. K. Hogdall, J. Blaakaer et al., “P53 autoantibodies in sera from Danish ovarian cancer patients and their correlation with clinical data and prognosis,” APMIS: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica, vol. 110, no. 7-8, pp. 545–553, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  46. A. K. Folkins, E. A. Jarboe, A. Saleemuddin et al., “A candidate precursor to pelvic serous cancer (p53 signature) and its prevalence in ovaries and fallopian tubes from women with BRCA mutations,” Gynecologic Oncology, vol. 109, no. 2, pp. 168–173, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  47. Y. Lee, A. Miron, R. Drapkin et al., “A candidate precursor to serous carcinoma that originates in the distal fallopian tube,” Journal of Pathology, vol. 211, no. 1, pp. 26–35, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  48. H. Naora, Y. Yang, F. J. Montz, J. D. Seidman, R. J. Kurman, and R. B. S. Roden, “A serologically identified tumor antigen encoded by a homeobox gene promotes growth of ovarian epithelial cells,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 98, no. 7, pp. 4060–4065, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed
  49. I. Korneeva, A. M. Bongiovanni, M. Girotra, T. A. Caputo, and S. S. Witkin, “Serum antibodies to the 27-kd heat shock protein in women with gynecologic cancers,” American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 183, no. 1, pp. 18–21, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed
  50. S. R. Chinni, R. Falchetto, C. Gercel-Taylor, J. Shabanowitz, D. F. Hunt, and D. D. Taylor, “Humoral immune responses to cathepsin D and glucose-regulated protein 78 in ovarian cancer patients,” Clinical Cancer Research, vol. 3, no. 9, pp. 1557–1564, 1997. View at Google Scholar
  51. E. Stockert, E. Jager, Y.-T. Chen et al., “A survey of the humoral immune response of cancer patients to a panel of human tumor antigens,” The Journal of Experimental Medicine, vol. 187, no. 8, pp. 1349–1354, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  52. D. W. Cramer, L. Titus-Ernstoff, J. R. McKolanis et al., “Conditions associated with antibodies against the tumor-associated antigen MUC1 and their relationship to risk for ovarian cancer,” Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention, vol. 14, no. 5, pp. 1125–1131, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed
  53. V. Yavelsky, S. Rohkin, R. Shaco-Levy et al., “Native human autoantibodies targeting GIPC1 identify differential expression in malignant tumors of the breast and ovary,” BMC Cancer, vol. 8, article 247, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed
  54. A. E. Lokshin, M. Winans, D. Landsittel et al., “Circulating IL-8 and anti-IL-8 autoantibody in patients with ovarian cancer,” Gynecologic Oncology, vol. 102, no. 2, pp. 244–251, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed
  55. J.-H. Kim, D. Herlyn, K.-K. Wong et al., “Identification of epithelial cell adhesion molecule autoantibody in patients with ovarian cancer,” Clinical Cancer Research, vol. 9, no. 13, pp. 4782–4791, 2003. View at Google Scholar
  56. M. Mark, F. M. Rijli, and P. Chambon, “Homeobox genes in embryogenesis and pathogenesis,” Pediatric Research, vol. 42, no. 4, pp. 421–429, 1997. View at Google Scholar
  57. C. Cillo, A. Faiella, M. Cantile, and E. Boncinelli, “Homeobox genes and cancer,” Experimental Cell Research, vol. 248, no. 1, pp. 1–9, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed
  58. B. T. Hennessy and G. B. Mills, “Ovarian cancer: homeobox genes, autocrine/paracrine growth, and kinase signaling,” International Journal of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, vol. 38, no. 9, pp. 1450–1456, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed
  59. V. Raman, S. A. Martenser, D. Reisman et al., “Compromised HOXA5 function can limit p53 expression in human breast tumours,” Nature, vol. 405, no. 6789, pp. 974–978, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed
  60. V. C. Bromleigh and L. P. Freedman, “p21 is a transcriptional target of HOXA10 in differentiating myelomonocytic cells,” Genes & Development, vol. 14, no. 20, pp. 2581–2586, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  61. J. W. van Oostveen, J. J. Bijl, F. M. Raaphorst, J. J. M. Walboomers, and C. J. L. M. Meijer, “The role of homeobox genes in normal hematopoiesis and hematological malignancies,” Leukemia, vol. 13, no. 11, pp. 1675–1690, 1999. View at Google Scholar
  62. A. P. G. Crijns, P. de Graeff, D. Geerts et al., “MEIS and PBX homeobox proteins in ovarian cancer,” European Journal of Cancer, vol. 43, no. 17, pp. 2495–2505, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed
  63. M. Widschwendter, S. Apostolidou, A. A. Jones et al., “HOXA methylation in normal endometrium from premenopausal women is associated with the presence of ovarian cancer: a proof of principle study,” International Journal of Cancer, vol. 125, no. 9, pp. 2214–2218, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed
  64. S. E. Conroy, P. D. Sasieni, V. Amin et al., “Antibodies to heat-shock protein 27 are associated with improved survival in patients with breast cancer,” British Journal of Cancer, vol. 77, no. 11, pp. 1875–1879, 1998. View at Google Scholar
  65. P. Benes, V. Vetvicka, and M. Fusek, “Cathepsin D—many functions of one aspartic protease,” Critical Reviews in Oncology/Hematology, vol. 68, no. 1, pp. 12–28, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed
  66. S. R. Chinni, C. Gercel-Taylor, G. E. Conner, and D. D. Taylor, “Cathepsin D antigenic epitopes identified by the humoral responses of ovarian cancer patients,” Cancer Immunology Immunotherapy, vol. 46, no. 1, pp. 48–54, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  67. D. D. Taylor, C. Gercel-Taylor, and L. P. Parker, “Patient-derived tumor-reactive antibodies as diagnostic markers for ovarian cancer,” Gynecologic Oncology, vol. 115, no. 1, pp. 112–120, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed
  68. J. L. Luborsky, A. Barua, S. V. Shatavi, T. Kebede, J. Abramowicz, and J. Rotmensch, “Anti-tumor antibodies in ovarian cancer,” American Journal of Reproductive Immunology, vol. 54, no. 2, pp. 55–62, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed
  69. S. B. Ho, G. A. Niehans, C. Lyftogt et al., “Heterogeneity of mucin gene expression in normal and neoplastic tissues,” Cancer Research, vol. 53, no. 3, pp. 641–651, 1993. View at Google Scholar
  70. S. Von Mensdorff-Pouilly, M. M. Gourevitch, P. Kenemans et al., “An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the measurement of circulating antibodies to polymorphic epithelial mucin (MUC1),” Tumor Biology, vol. 19, no. 3, pp. 186–195, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  71. E. R. Richards, P. L. Devine, R. J. Quin, J. D. Fontenot, B. G. Ward, and M. A. McGuckin, “Antibodies reactive with the protein core of MUC1 mucin are present in ovarian cancer patients and healthy women,” Cancer Immunology, Immunotherapy, vol. 46, no. 5, pp. 245–252, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  72. Y. Hamanaka, Y. Suehiro, M. Fukui, K. Shikichi, K. Imai, and Y. Hinoda, “Circulating anti-MUC1 IGG antibodies as a favorable prognostic factor for pancreatic cancer,” International Journal of Cancer, vol. 103, no. 1, pp. 97–100, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed
  73. A. Favre-Bonvin, C. Reynaud, C. Kretz-Remy, and P. Jalinot, “Human papillomavirus type 18 E6 protein binds the cellular PDZ protein TIP-2/GIPC, which is involved in transforming growth factor β signaling and triggers its degradation by the proteasome,” Journal of Virology, vol. 79, no. 7, pp. 4229–4237, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed
  74. L.-H. Wang, R. G. Kalb, and S. M. Strittmatter, “A PDZ protein regulates the distribution of the transmembrane semaphorin, M-SemF,” Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol. 274, no. 20, pp. 14137–14146, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  75. O. Salama, S. Herrmann, A. Tziknovsky et al., “Chemiluminescent optical fiber immunosensor for detection of autoantibodies to ovarian and breast cancer-associated antigens,” Biosensors & Bioelectronics, vol. 22, no. 7, pp. 1508–1516, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed
  76. C. Chapman, A. Murray, J. Chakrabarti et al., “Autoantibodies in breast cancer: their use as an aid to early diagnosis,” Annals of Oncology, vol. 18, no. 5, pp. 868–873, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  77. C. J. Chapman, A. Murray, J. E. McElveen et al., “Autoantibodies in lung cancer: possibilities for early detection and subsequent cure,” Thorax, vol. 63, no. 3, pp. 228–233, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  78. L. Zhong, K. Ge, J. C. Zu et al., “Autoantibodies as potential biomarkers for breast cancer,” Breast Cancer Research, vol. 10, no. 3, article R40, 2008. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus