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Journal of Oncology
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 426956, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/426956
Review Article

Role of Chemokine Network in the Development and Progression of Ovarian Cancer: A Potential Novel Pharmacological Target

Laboratory of Pharmacology, Department of Oncology, Biology and Genetics, University of Genova, 16132 Genova, Italy

Received 11 June 2009; Accepted 28 September 2009

Academic Editor: Tian-Li Wang

Copyright © 2010 Federica Barbieri et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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