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Journal of Oncology
Volume 2010, Article ID 646340, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/646340
Research Article

Tumor Spreading to the Contralateral Ovary in Bilateral Ovarian Carcinoma Is a Late Event in Clonal Evolution

1Department of Medical Genetics, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, 0310 Oslo, Norway
2Department of Cancer Prevention, Institute for Cancer Research, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, 0310 Oslo, Norway
3Centre for Cancer Biomedicine, University of Oslo, 0310 Oslo, Norway
4Department of Pathology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, 0310 Oslo, Norway
5Department of Gynecology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, 0310 Oslo, Norway
6Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, 0310 Oslo, Norway

Received 25 May 2009; Accepted 25 June 2009

Academic Editor: Ben Davidson

Copyright © 2010 Francesca Micci et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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