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Journal of Oncology
Volume 2011, Article ID 465343, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/465343
Review Article

Cancer Stem Cells: Repair Gone Awry?

1Division of Cellular Therapy, Hematology and Oncology, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
2Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Snyderman Building (GSRB-1), 595 LaSalle Street, Suite 1073, Durham, NC 27710, USA

Received 20 September 2010; Accepted 23 October 2010

Academic Editor: Bo Lu

Copyright © 2011 Fatima Rangwala et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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