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Journal of Oncology
Volume 2012, Article ID 351089, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/351089
Review Article

Matricellular Proteins: A Sticky Affair with Cancers

School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551

Received 1 June 2011; Revised 2 November 2011; Accepted 2 November 2011

Academic Editor: Dominic Fan

Copyright © 2012 Han Chung Chong et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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